The Diary of Anne Frank: A Review

The Diary of Anne Frank: A Review

The Diary of Anne Frank is a renowned and heavily studied story imbued with touching narrative that evokes a profound emotional response in its audience. Collingwood’s recent production of the play was expertly executed by two contrasting casts that were each able to offer their own facets to the story. Within the depths of the Darlene S. Howard blackbox theater, Anne Frank’s cast spent the last few months slaving away to put on a show that would garner a lasting and thought-provoking effect.

With a fiercely intricate set that explored breaking production conventions and toyed with levels to resemble the attic the family once resided in, Anne Frank came to life stunningly before our eyes. You were drawn to different parts of the makeshift stage as the actors flitted about, but the physicality of it only added to its overarching realism. I had the privilege of seeing both casts and was compelled by the way in which the actors approached their characters in a different light between the two shows, each bringing a new level of attainable depth. The story is a sweetly touching yet disturbingly morose tale that is hard to find humor in, but the cast was successful in balancing out its darker moments with the perfect amount of infused comedy.

Collingwood’s drama department never disappoints and Anne Frank was no exception, the strikingly realistic depiction fostering an intimate interaction with the audience. Each actor crafted a well-rounded depiction of their characters and was able to approach their part with a deep-seated level of intensity often hard to achieve. Congratulations to the ever-talented cast of The Diary of Anne Frank. I am looking forward to what the drama department has in store for the rest of the year.

By: Emily Larman 

Terry Fox Run – September 30th

Terry Fox Run – September 30th

One for the History Books

One for the History Books